Author Archives: motivationfortheworld

About motivationfortheworld

Gary A. McAbee created Motivation for the World as the platform for his motivational speaking, writing, and blogging. The mission of Motivation for the World is to create a vast network of like-minded, service-oriented individuals who join together and work toward having a positive impact in our neighborhoods, communities, and society. He is the proud author of two self-help books: Wake Up! 42 Ways to Improve Black America Now! and Rise Up! 42 Additional Ways to Improve Black America Now!

The League, The Anthem, The Truth

ball2

Welcome back NBA! Now that the 2017-2018 NBA season has started, we have a little housekeeping to do concerning the National Anthem. I am sure everyone is waiting to see what players on teams around the league will do once the anthem is played. For the record, I hope they do something, and continue to do something throughout the season. If they take a knee, I will applaud them. If they sit down, I will applaud them. If they stand up, I will applaud them. In my opinion, as long as some of the players show their support for the cause, I will applaud them.

Of course, one must ask what cause I am referring to. I am referring to the original cause. You know it by now: protesting during the anthem against police misconduct and brutality in communities across the nation. THIS IS THE CAUSE. It is the cause started by Colin Kaepernick of the NFL. As Kaepernick said, this is not about the flag, nor is it about disrespecting the military or soldiers. Instead, it is a simple, yet powerful statement to raise awareness of police brutality towards people of color.

Side note: Whether you agree with it or not, this is the cause he stated as the reason for his protests during the National Anthem. To put any other label on the protests is unfair, especially when the cause has been clearly stated. It is true, you have your right to your own opinion, but changing the narrative that has been identified to wrong.

Now that the NBA is back in season, one must wonder what the reaction will be if players protest. I have a good idea based upon what we have heard already…

…the players have no respect for the military.

…the players have no reason to be upset because they are doing well financially.

and the kicker…

…the players should be doing something about black-on-black crime (or the gun violence in Chicago).

If the players protest, you and I both know it’s coming! Let one NBA player protest the anthem, and I guarantee you will hear at least one of these reactions. Well I am here to dispel these ideas that NBA players (and athletes in general) are not on the frontlines standing against issues that affect their communities. Let me be even clearer: black athletes are consistently involved in making a positive impact in the black community. Black athletes deal with issues like poverty, violence, and education in our communities.

Critics want proof. While I am not here to provide an extensive list, I will provide information easily found online to defend NBA players against the attacks that are sure to come. These examples show NBA players, through their own charitable foundations, and NBA teams in action fighting against social issues. In fact, the NBA has programs that work with the military and police as well. All of these and numerous other examples can be found by searching online.

So remember, if you see NBA players take a knee or take a seat during the National Anthem, please understand that they are more than just athletes. They are aware, concerned, and fighting against issues in black communities across the country.

 

NBA Cares

NBA Cares works with internationally recognized youth-serving programs that support education, youth and family development, and health-related causes, including: Thurgood Marshall College Fund, Special Olympics, YMCA of the USA, Boys & Girls Clubs of America, UNICEF, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, Share Our Strength and GLSEN.

http://cares.nba.com/

 

NBA Cares Hoops For Troops

NBA Cares Hoops for Troops is a year-round initiative led by the NBA, its teams and players in collaboration with the Department of Defense, USO and other military and veteran-serving organizations to honor active and retired service men and women and their families.

http://hoopsfortroops.nba.com

 

NBA Cares My Brother’s Keeper

In 2014, the NBA family set a goal to recruit 25,000 new mentors over five years, with a focus on adult males of color. Less than three years into the partnership and less than one year since the campaign’s launch, more than 25,000 Americans have already signed up to become a mentor and been connected directly to a mentoring program in their community.

http://cares.nba.com/my-brothers-keeper/

 

Chicago Bulls Charities

http://www.nba.com/bulls/gallery/chicago-bulls-youth-guidance-and-chicago-police-department-host-basketball-tournament

On July 18, the Chicago Bulls and Jordan Brand hosted a basketball tournament and conversation circles at the Advocate Center for students in Youth Guidance’s Becoming a Man (BAM) program and Chicago Police Department officers.

 

Joakim Noah, Player NY Knicks- Noah’s Arc

Noah’s Arc arts programs give young people in under-served areas and those who are dealing with emotional and/or physical adversity the opportunity to engage in powerful self-expression.

https://www.noahsarcfoundation.org/

 

Dwayne Wade (Chicago native), player Cleveland Cavaliers- Live to Dream Program

The Live To Dream program was developed in part to assist the City of Chicago in their continued efforts to decrease the violence and fatalities by providing safe havens and high quality programming for youth.

http://www.wadesworldfoundation.org/livetodream/

 

 

Advertisements

What Would Have Been Your Reaction to Racism? Which Person Are You?

Which person are you? 

Question Mark

Recently there was a primary to select candidates who will run for the office of mayor of St. Petersburg, Florida. During the campaign, the candidates had the opportunity to participate in a forum. There were six candidates at the forum. The rules for the forum were strict, and guidelines included how candidates could respond. One candidate was asked a question, and then the next two candidates had the opportunity to respond. After this, a new question would be presented and the next candidate would start the question and answer process again. In this way, the moderator could keep order during the forum and all candidates could get equal time to speak (remember this key point).

For context, I will provide an answer to a question by one of the candidates and the response it received (NOTE: the focus here is not on the answer, but the response that was given. I welcome debating the merits of the answer at another time in another forum)…

Answer: “My commitment is to reparations to the community, to the black community that has suffered these damages under these current administrations,” …answered, adding that “no amount of playground or recreation centers could “heal the wounds” of victims’ families of died at the hands of law enforcement officers”.

Response: “…you and your people talk about reparations. The reparations that you talk about… your people already got your reparations.  Your reparations, your reparations came in the form of a man named Barack Obama.  My advice to you, if you don’t like it here in America, planes leave every hour from Tampa airport. Go back to Africa. Go back to Africa. Go back!”

After this exchange, the candidate who offered the answer could not respond because it was no longer his turn. Shortly thereafter, one candidate broke the rules of the forum to address the response he heard. He offered a harsh rebuke to the tone and substance of the response. Another candidate wanted to rebuke the response, but chose not to draw more attention to the response. (Instead, he offered his response and rebuke the next day). Other candidates chose not to comment on the response.

Who are the candidates?

  • The candidate who supplied the answer: Person A
  • The candidate who supplied the response: Person B
  • The candidate who supplied the rebuke at the forum: Person C
  • The candidate who supplied the rebuke the next day: Person D
  • The candidate(s) who chose to say nothing: Person(s) E

What Would Have Been Your Reaction to Racism? Which Person Are You?

Are you Person A: someone who would have offered a response to racism if given an opportunity?

Are you Person B: someone who makes racist comments or fans the flames of racism?

Are you Person C: someone who hears about racism, and speaks out against it regardless of the circumstances?

Are you Person D: someone who wants to speak out against racism, but does not know the time or place or how to do so when a racist comment or incident occurs?

Are you Person(s) E: someone who chooses not to respond to racism at all for unknown reasons?

 

Before you answer, think about each person and SOME POTENTIAL reasons for their behavior.

Person A was “silenced” so his voice and opinion may “never” be heard. He represents those who do not have a voice or platform to speak out.

Person B used the forum as an opportunity to publicly use racist language without concern for who it might offend. He represents those who want to fan the flames of racism for unknown reasons.

Person C used the forum to respond and “fight” against racism. He represents those who speak out against racism as soon as they recognize it.

Person D did respond, but after thought and consideration led him to speak out later. He represents those who know racism is wrong, but may not be comfortable with responding to racism or the method to do so.

Person(s) E turned a blind eye to racist language and remarks. They represent those who choose not to respond, possibly because it does not affect or offend them personally.

 

You are now a spectator at the forum for the candidates for mayor of the city of St. Petersburg, Florida. You just witnessed the question, the answer, the response, the delay, and the silence…

 

What Would Have Been Your Reaction to Racism? Which Person Are You?

Article: http://www.wtsp.com/news/local/pinellascounty/st-pete-mayoral-candidate-during-forum-go-back-to-africa/457867422

 

Gary McAbee is an educator, author and motivational speaker. He has written three books: Wake Up!, Rise Up!, and Defining Success: One Word at a Time.

They Wanted the Presidential Pendulum to Swing, So They Voted Against Their Own Interests

Analysts, pundits, and even voters have questioned how the political rise of Donald Trump happened so quickly. There are several narratives to explain Trump’s ascent to the Presidency. He is an outsider without “ties” to Washington. He is not a politician. He is a job creator. While each of these statements is true to some degree, I believe there is a different reason for Trump. To me, it’s obvious: the main reason why Donald Trump is now the President of the United States is because a lot of people wanted the “Presidential Pendulum” to swing as far away from Barack Hussein Obama as possible.

pendulum

  • A lot of people cast their vote , in large part because they wanted the “Presidential Pendulum” to swing as far away from Barack Hussein Obama as possible.
  • A lot of people can see our demographics changing, so they wanted the “Presidential Pendulum” to swing as far away from Barack Hussein Obama as possible.
  • A lot of people desire to “Make America Great Again,” so they wanted the “Presidential Pendulum” to swing as far away from Barack Hussein Obama as possible.

Opponents and critics intentionally presented doom and gloom scenarios about a Barack Hussein Obama Presidency to scare people. Even though many of the doomsday scenarios the Obama Presidency was sure to bring never occurred, people were scared. Even as the Obama Presidency came to end, people were still scared. Even in the post-Obama era, people will be scared going forward. They needed someone to alleviate their fears. They chose Donald Trump. They wanted the “Presidential Pendulum” to swing as far away from Barack Hussein Obama as possible.

One thing about the transition of power from Barack Hussein Obama to Donald Trump is many people chose to vote against their own interests because they wanted the “Presidential Pendulum” to swing as far away from Barack Hussein Obama as possible. Let’s apply some logic by using a couple examples. To be clear, not all voters use one criterion to determine their vote. Also, not all people in deep-red states blindly vote Republican. Nevertheless, the examples that follow are worth consideration.

If Obama was the “Food Stamp President” and voting for Hillary Clinton was an extension of his policies, then why would deep-red states vote Republican? Take Mississippi for example. In 2015, Mississippi ranked first in the percentage of residents on food stamps (21.7%), and had over 650,000 total recipients. Although this is not the only reason to cast a vote, if I was a food stamp recipient in Mississippi I would strongly consider voting for any Democrat, especially the “Food Stamp President” (similar food stamp statistics also exist in deep-red states like Tennessee, Louisiana, and West Virginia to name a few).

Sure, this is only one example of people potentially voting against their interests because they wanted the “Presidential Pendulum” to swing as far away from Barack Hussein Obama as possible. Another example is healthcare. As we all know, the controversy surrounding the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) has been tremendous. Republicans have held numerous unsuccessful votes to repeal Obamacare. Now that Donald Trump is in Office, the race to repeal Obamacare has picked up even more steam. Yet voters in deep-red states have enrolled in and benefit from Obamacare, so repeal would cause them to lose, or at least change, their healthcare options. Keep in mind that a lot of these people were uninsured before Obamacare.

A list of Obamacare enrollments in some deep-red states as of January 17, 2017:

  • Alabama: 178,414
  • Georgia: 493,880
  • South Carolina: 230,211
  • Tennessee: 234,125
  • Texas: 1,227,290

To be clear, this does not mean all of the Obamacare enrollees voted Republican, but you can be sure some of them did. It also does not mean those who voted against this interest would have turned the result of the election in each particular state from Republican to Democrat. Yet it does show that people in deep-red states, who have been “told” how bad Obamacare is, still benefit from the law. If I was an Obamacare enrollee in Tennessee I would strongly consider voting for any Democrat, because their party introduced Obamacare.

These are not the only examples of people potentially voting against their interests because they wanted the “Presidential Pendulum” to swing as far away from Barack Hussein Obama as possible. If you want more, look for thing like “Obama Deporter-in-Chief”, Obama phones, and Obama and The Dodd-Frank Act as three additional reasons why deep red state Republican voters could have leaned Democrat instead of voting against their self-interests. Careful review of these, and many other examples, leads me to believe that there was a reason for the vitriol against Barack Hussein Obama and the love for Donald Trump (not to mention the hatred for Hillary Clinton).

For me it’s obvious:

They wanted to slow the demographic shift of the United States, so they voted against their own interests.

They wanted to erase the legacy of Barack Hussein Obama, so they voted against their own interests. 

They wanted the “Presidential Pendulum” to swing as far away from Barack Hussein Obama as possible, so they voted against their own interests.

What is not so obvious is who are “they”?

 

 

 

I’m Mad With Your Race

A lady I know, let’s call her 223, approached me and said “I’m mad at your race!” She is white. The “good” news is she felt “comfortable” saying this to me. I like to know where people stand on issues of race and culture. The bad news is I knew where this was headed. I responded with two questions:
“What race?”  
“The human race?”
Her response was “no, I mean YOUR race.” I replied, “oh, you mean MY race.”
Before we continue, let me provide a little background information. The debate about confederate flags and monuments, and Neo-Nazis and the KKK, is currently engulfing our nation. It seems that community after community is facing the question about what to do with Confederate monuments that are a sense of pride for some, and a symbol of hate for others. Here in the Tampa Bay area, removal of a monument of two Confederate soldiers has been a hot topic and it has spawned a heated debate. With this as the backdrop, 223 thought it was appropriate to say to me “I’m mad at YOUR race!”
Now that we established 223’s anger with “MY race,” I pressed on with the conversation. “Why are you mad with MY race?”
223 responded, “Because you want the monuments taken down.”
These are the times when I go into my interviewer/teacher/great debater role. I welcome these conversations; you know the ones about “MY race,” provided the person I am speaking to is willing to listen. Most of the time, I know these conversations probably will not resolve anything or change anyone’s opinion. But, I believe that if we talk these things out and try to listen to each other, at least we might get a glimpse (and maybe a little understanding) of how others think.  I tend to ask questions too, in hopes of getting my “opponent” to think and provide answer to support their point-of-view. Hold that thought…
So I engaged 223 with my interviewer hat on. “You do realize there are plenty of (using Donald Trump’s words) “very fine people,” I mean WHITE people who also want the monuments taken down too. Are you also mad at them?”
There was my first question. I threw that pitch right down the middle of the plate! I just wanted an answer that would confirm what I already knew, but hoped was not true: she was really mad at MY race.
She didn’t give a response! Instead, she launched into the next talking point (also espoused by Donald Trump). 223 said “who comes next: George Washington and Thomas Jefferson?” I was ready for that one. It was time to put on my teacher hat. “You do realize why Washington and Jefferson are viewed differently right?” No response to question two either.
Time to teach. Washington and Jefferson (and the other Founding Fathers), though neither saints  nor heroes in my eyes, at least had the forethought to put mechanisms in place to “decide” questions of race in the future. Although their idea was to produce a perfect union, they knew the society they created had flaws, which is one reason why the Constitution they created can be amended as needed. I give them credit for that. However, their reluctance to act upon their moral responsibility to end the “peculiar institution” has caused a, slow, but steady ripple effect that leads some people, even in 2017 to say: “I’m mad at YOUR race!”
Back to the story. This trail of logic would have been too much for 223, so I condensed it. I told her, “the difference is Washington and Jefferson never took up arms against the United States. The soldiers on this and other Confederate monuments (in particular Robert E. Lee) did. So monuments erected for them are viewed differently.”
Although this wasn’t a question, I thought maybe I could get a response worthy of continuing the “conversation.” Instead I got this: “well they were all involved in slavery.”  This is a valid point. But, it misses the mark because Washington and Jefferson are known more for the good they accomplished for our country. Robert E. Lee is known for his opposition to our country. I knew this response would require the great debater role in me. Should I take it there?
I did want to lay a tactful, yet pointed, smack down on my “opponent,” because unknowingly (I think) she put her foot in the slavery “debate.” All I needed to hear next was the talking point about how good slavery was for MY race back then. Believe it or not, in 2017, there are people who present and even accept as true the idea that slavery was beneficial…
Sometimes you should accept the fact that you have the high ground, and your opponent can’t take it from you. I was there. Any further conversation would have led to an “unnecessary” confrontation. I could not change 223’s heart or mind. It wasn’t worth it. I am the kind of person who can agree to disagree. By the way, I do like 223 as a person, and I think she likes me as a person too. However, I am not sure if our “acquaintance” trumps (pun intended) her opinion of “MY race.” It does mean I should keep 223 at the proper distance in regards to this topic, unless she chooses to have meaningful dialogue about it in the future.
I guess 223 is still mad at “MY race.”
What really concerns me is how many others feel the same way?

African American Cultural Norms

kente cloth

These are the cultural norms of African Americans…

The Extended Family

  • Cousins, Aunts, Mother, Father, Uncle

Informal Adoption

  • By blood relative and non-relatives… Play mom (Godmother, Godfather), play cousins, play nieces, play nephews, play grandmothers, play grandfathers)

Religious Orientation

  • Involved in some type of church religious activity

High Value on Children

  • Children come first

Respect for the Elderly

  • Always respectful to adults and especially to the elderly

Flexible Family Roles

  • Mother working and father taking care of kids

Respect

  • For self and community

Restraint

  • Not doing something that you know you should not do. Knowing right from wrong

Responsibility

  • To self, family, and community

Reciprocity

  • I keep the kids one day and you keep the kids the next.

 

Can you think of any examples of how these cultural values apply to you and your family?

kente cloth

Hill, Robert B. Ph. D 1999. The Strengths of African American Families- Twenty-five Years Later. University Press of America, Lanham, MD.
Sudarkasa, Niara. Ph. D “Interpreting the African Heritage in Afro-American Family Organization.” Pp 27-43 in Black Families, Ed. Harrielle, P. McAdoo, Newbury, Park, CA: Sage Publications, (1988).

Flashback: Two Thoughts About LeBron James

Enjoy this flashback to an article I published in 2014…

Basketball

Two Thoughts About LeBron James

My first thought about LeBron James is I wish he would have stayed in Cleveland and won a championship for that city. Imagine the scene in Cleveland:

– LeBron James, the local hero, brings home a title to a town starving for a championship.

– Cleveland celebrates its championship with the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a backdrop.

– A statue outside Quicken Loans Arena serves as a permanent reminder of his greatness.

But wait, none of this happened! Instead, LeBron James took his talents to South Beach and the rest is history. Sure, he left the team that drafted him in search of titles elsewhere, but other athletes have done this, too. He teamed up with other superstars for a coordinated run at a title. It was not the first time this happened, either.

Did he disparage Cleveland and all things about the Cavaliers on his way out the door? No, he chose not to do so. Surely he must have broken a rule that prevents players from ever leaving one “workplace” to go to another? No such rule exists.

So what is the “crime” committed by LeBron James?

Maybe he should have told the Cavaliers of his intention to leave the team first. Maybe he should not have gone on television to make “The Decision.” I get it, but did these two missteps warrant the venom spewed at LeBron James from both fans and foes alike? After “The Decision,” he was instantly regarded as one of the most hated athletes in professional sports. I have to wonder why he still receives this punishment.

We want our athletes to be well-behaved on the court. This describes LeBron James.

We want our athletes to stay out of trouble and be model citizens. This describes LeBron James.

We want our athletes to play hard, play smart, and play fair. This describes LeBron James.

Is the punishment worth the “crime?”

Our criticism of athletes, though sometimes valid, can extend well beyond what we really know about the world they live in. We seem to think that we know how it feels to be a world-class athlete. We also think we know what it’s like to perform while millions of people are watching. We believe that we know how professional athletes should act just because they are well-compensated. Then we use this information, lay it at the feet of our athletes, and take inventory. Is it really a “crime” if they don’t measure up to our lofty standards as fans?

My second thought about LeBron James is I think he has been punished more than enough for the “crime” he committed. I want him to be judged by his performance on the court, instead of a decision made off the court. I guess time will tell if he will ever be embraced like he was years ago. Who knows? Just ask the multitude of Cleveland Cavaliers fans still dreaming of a championship and a LeBron James statue for their opinion.

 

UPDATE: King James returned to the Cleveland Cavaliers. In 2016, he led the charge and brought the city of Cleveland and fans of the Cavaliers the NBA championship.

 

Let’s Ball and Brand… with Humility

Ball

The 2017 NBA Draft is upon us and there is little doubt most, if not all, eyes will be on Lonzo Ball from UCLA. Ball will be in the mix as the top player in the draft and possibly the number one pick overall. Good for him. He is a special talent who should be able to make any team better thanks to his wide variety of skills. In fact, I believe he has a chance to be a great one. One thing I like about Lonzo Ball is he seems to be humble. He seems to have a splash of humility that allows him to stay grounded. I could be wrong, but this is the impression I get when watching him play and hearing him speak. Unfortunately, the same can’t be said about his father, LaVar Ball.

LaVar Ball, to his credit, has raised both Lonzo and his younger brothers LaMelo and LiAngelo, to be basketball prodigies and future pros. Forget what you may think about those parents who push their kids in sports, Mr. Ball has set his kids up for a bright future. Who wouldn’t want that for their kids? However, what LaVar Ball is also doing is putting extra pressure on his sons that does not have to be there. He could sit back and enjoy the fruits of their labor, and then ride their talents all the way to the bank. Instead, he chooses to be the center of attention with his over-the-top, used car salesman antics. One must ask why?

I believe LaVar Ball is a smart man. He is trying to hype his sons in order to sell his (their) Big Baller Brand to the masses. It is a great strategy. In fact, the set up the Ball family has is a marketers dream. They have three good-looking, talented basketball playing sons with unlimited potential. They have created a brand. They have a platform to promote and sell their brand. They have name-recognition. They have a chance to increase their following by performing on and off the basketball court. With so much going for them, is there any way things can go wrong?

The answer is yes. If the Ball family, LaVar Ball in-particular, chooses to ball and brand with arrogance, then their brand could suffer. The built-in advantages they have could slowly fade over time. The fans that surely support them now, could turn and support other players. The sales they could make over the long haul could dry up quickly. To prevent this from happening, I suggest the Ball family, LaVar Ball in-particular, chooses to ball and brand with humility.

How can the Ball family ball and brand with humility? We can start by notating what it means to operate with humility. Humility means to show modesty and humbleness. In the face of having tremendous talent, I am sure this can be a difficult thing to do. Understandably, a talented player like Lonzo Ball may struggle with this issue, especially when people constantly remind him of his greatness. However, as long as he plays it somewhat “low-key”, I think he will be able to manage it. He could ball and brand with humility. I think he already does.

On the other hand, thanks to his father it appears he and his entire family is loud, brash, and in-your-face. Make no mistake about it: the Ball sons, and their brand, are coming. LaVar Ball wants us to know this, and he goes to great lengths to promote his sons and his billion-dollar dream. That’s great! However, many people resent the success of others, regardless of how it is attained. This resentment can grow if one chooses to flaunt their success and good fortune. So, the Ball family has a choice to make: ball and brand with arrogance or ball and brand with humility. Based on LaVar Ball’s track record in the spotlight so far, one has to wonder what choice they will make.

Mr. Ball claims to be on “the same” level as a player to some of the all-time greats. How he could put his name in the same sentence as Michael Jordan and Charles Barkley is beyond my understanding. How he could compare his son Lonzo to Magic Johnson is beyond my understanding. How he could blame the loss UCLA suffered on slow, white players who played alongside Lonzo is beyond my understanding. How he could say his sons are set up better than LeBron James’s sons is beyond my understanding. I guess Mr. Ball, and the reasons why he makes the proclamations he does, is beyond my understanding too. Thus far, he is choosing to ball and brand with arrogance, rather than choosing to ball and brand with humility.

Maybe this what he wants: to be known as a loud-mouthed pitchman seeking the fifteen minutes of fame his basketball career never provided. Bravo LaVar Ball, bravo! You have turned yourself into the center of attention, as well as put a white-hot spotlight on your son before he even sets foot on an NBA practice court. Imagine what it will be like when Lonzo Ball meets Stephen Curry on the hardwood for the first time. By the way, LaVar Ball said his son Lonzo is better than Curry right now. I am sure than the two competitors will treat it as good competition, but the circus will follow Lonzo Ball for that game. Unfortunately it will follow LaVar Ball. I guess I am in the circus now too (but at least I chose not to give Mr. Ball any additional free publicity here by linking to stories about his antics).  

For the record, I hope Lonzo Ball has a tremendous, hall-of-fame worthy career. I hope LaMelo Ball has a tremendous, hall-of-fame worthy career. I hope LiAngelo gets there too. I hope their Big Baller Brand becomes a household name. I hope they build and accumulate wealth beyond their wildest dreams too. However, here’s what I don’t want. I don’t want to hear about those things from LaVar Ball as they unfold. I don’t want to see this pitchman every time one of his sons is on the court. I don’t want to listen to anymore interviews of this man either. But, something tells me this will not be the case.

Hopefully Lonzo, LaMelo, and LiAngelo Ball choose to ball and brand with humility. Then maybe LaVar Ball will choose to do the same.